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Hiking at Prince Gallitzin State Park

32.65 miles of trails

The trails pass through many habitats and near the lake.

McDermott Trail

0.8 mile, easiest hiking

This trail leads from a small parking area along Beaver Valley Road to Bosar Point, the peninsula that separates the Killbuck and Mud Lick fingers of Glendale Lake. The point is a great place to view spring waterfowl.

Haddie Buck Peninsula Trails (central)

Lakeshore Trail

0.75 mile, easiest hiking

Beginning between cabins 7 and 8, this forested walking trail runs along Glendale Lake and has several scenic views. At Muskrat Beach, the trail follows the service road to the group tenting area where it meets Hughes Trail.

Muskrat Beach Trail

0.5 mile, easiest hiking

This trail links Troxell Point and Plessinger trails to Muskrat Beach.

Plessinger Trail

1.2 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail leads from the Prince Gallitzin Marina entrance road to Muskrat Beach Day Use Area 1 and meets Muskrat Beach Trail.

Troxell Point Trail

2.8 miles, more difficult hiking

This long trail begins at the parking lot along Marina Road near the Pa. Game Commission maintenance building. This trail crosses the length of Haddie Buck Peninsula to Troxell Point. Many trails intersect Troxel Point Trail providing the opportunity for side loops and alternate pathways.

Turkey Ridge Trail

1.2 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail intersects Troxel Point Trail twice and passes through Day Use Area 3. Turkey Ridge Trail passes through a variety of habitats, offering the chance to see a wide variety of animal and bird species. The majority of the trail is relatively flat, making it a good family hike.

Hughes Trail

0.9 mile, more difficult hiking

This trail begins in the group tenting area and joins Troxell Point Trail.

Point Trailhead/Campground Trails (central west)

Deer Trail

0.7 mile, easiest hiking

Follow this trail into State Game Lands 108 to discover food plots for wildlife. Lucky hikers can see deer or other animals feeding. This trail intersects with Forest Trail.

Forest Trail

0.4 mile, easiest hiking

Watch scampering chipmunks and hear chattering red squirrels while strolling under a canopy of beech, maple, and hemlock trees. This short loop is one of the easiest trails in the park.

Footprint Trail

0.8 mile, more difficult hiking

Follow this loop for a fleeting view of the Wyerough Branch to the lake. Near the midway point, hikers can relax on the bench and scout for herons, osprey, and bald eagle.

Poems Trail

0.6 mile, easiest hiking

Learn about nature through poetry. Pick up a trail guide at the trailhead and follow this trail and read the poems that correspond with locations along the trail. This is an easy walking trail with many interesting poems about nature.

Point Trail

2.8 miles, more difficult hiking

This relatively rugged trail with lots of exposed roots begins at the Point Trailhead. The top loop of the trail follows Crooked Run Branch. The bottom loop of the trail follows the shoreline or a hillside. The trees are a mix of hemlock and hardwoods providing a shady walk.

Campground Trail

2.2 miles, easiest hiking

This trail follows the shoreline and topography around the campground. Five benches along the trail are great for relaxing and viewing wildlife. This trail is popular for mountain biking.

Shomo Fields Trails (north)

Rhody Trail

1.1 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail takes you through Dixon Hollow starting along Swartz Road and ending at Wyerough Finger. Make a loop by taking Herman Fields or Reed trails along the way.

Reed Trail

0.6 mile, more difficult hiking

This short trail connects Westrick Trail to Rhody Trail.

Westrick Trail

0.7 mile, more difficult hiking

This trail begins near Pavilion 1 at Pickerel Pond, crosses Beaver Valley Road and steadily climbs to Shomo Fields then intersects Herman Fields Trail.

Herman Fields Trail

0.7 mile, easiest hiking

Starting at an old road gate along Beaver Valley Road, this trail climbs the hill to join Rhody Trail and intersects with Westrick Trail along the way.

Gates Trail

2.2 miles, more difficult hiking

Accessed from Swartz Road or from Bollinger Trail near McKees Run Boat Launch, this trail loops around the hill above McKees Run.

Bollinger Trail

4.1 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail stretches from Pickerel Pond to Glendale Dam, passing Beaverdam Marina, the soccer field at Beaver Valley, and intersecting many trails. Mountain bikers, horseback riders, and snowmobilers all use the trail.

Bater Patch Trails (northeast)

Old Glendale Road Trail

1.9 miles, easiest hiking

This trail leads from the Glendale Dam across the dam and follows the shoreline along the Slate Lick arm of Glendale Lake to the Bater Patch Trailhead. Along the way it connects to Hagaratty Trail. This is a beautiful walk through the woods with great opportunities to see birds and wildlife.

Hagaratty Trail

1.5 miles, more difficult hiking

Starts near the Glendale Dam from the Old Glendale Road Trail and follows along Snake Ridge before descending to meet Old Glendale Road Trail at the Bater Patch Trailhead.

Slate Lick Trails (southeast)

Foster Run Trail

1.7 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail runs from the Bater Patch Trailhead south along a ridge and then down to the lake near Noel Run. This remote area of the park consists of thick brushy woods over rolling hills. During the summer this trail is used primarily for horseback riding, but is also open to hiking, mountain biking, and snowmobiling.

Noel Run Connector Trail

0.6 mile, more difficult hiking

This short connector tail connects Foster Run Trail to the Glendale Riding Trails. During the summer, this trail is used primarily for horseback riding, but is also open to hiking and snowmobiling.

Glendale Riding Trails

1.8 miles, more difficult hiking

This is a series of interloping trails that is primarily used as a horseback riding area for horseback riding concession. Some trails have heavy humps from many years of equestrian use. During the summer, the primary use is horseback riding and other users should be aware and yield to horses. The area consists of rolling terrain through woods with heavy underbrush.