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Hiking at Little Pine State Park

10.77 miles of trails

There are also many miles of trails in the adjacent Tiadaghton State Forest.

Button Ball Trail

0.49 mile, easiest hiking

This angler’s trail gives access to lower Little Pine Creek.

Carsontown Trail

0.88 mile, easiest hiking

This trail is recommended for families with small children. A wide variety of wildflowers may be found along this trail and deer are seen frequently.

Lake Shore Trail

5.5 miles, more difficult hiking

This is the flattest trail in the park and parallels the lake into the upper part of the park. A wide variety of birds and animals can be viewed if the trail is traveled quietly.

Sections of the following trails are very steep. These trails require a hiker to be in good physical condition.

Panther Run Trail

2.9 miles, most difficult hiking

Beautiful vistas, rock outcroppings, and a flagstone quarry can be seen along the trail. This is the most scenic trail in the park.

Spikebuck Hollow Trail

1 mile, most difficult hiking

Outcroppings of rock, flagstone, and a wide variety of trees and plants can be seen along the trail.

Mid State Trail

This 250-mile backpacking trail, which goes from Juniata County to Tioga County, passes through the park. At places, the Mid State Trail and park trails run along the same path. This trail is steep and narrow in places, but well defined and marked. People backpacking along the Mid State Trail may leave a vehicle in the second car parking lot of the campground, providing they notify park personnel. Name, address, proposed route, and expected return date are requested.

Pine Creek Rail Trail

Located four miles from the park in Waterville, this multi-use trail is for hiking, biking, and cross-country skiing. It stretches 62 miles from Jersey Shore to Wellsboro Junction along Pine Creek. The upper portion of the trail is in the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon. Access areas, benches, and restrooms are at various places along the trail.

The scenery along the trail is magnificent. Trail users can view dramatic rock outcrops, waterfalls, and wildlife like eagle, osprey, coyote, deer, wild turkey, heron, river otter, black bear, and many others. Diverse plant life, scattered old-growth timber, historic pine and spruce plantations, and several foundations from the Civilian Conservation Corps era can be found along the trail.