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Skip Navigation LinksDCNR > State Parks > Find a Park > Laurel Ridge State Park > Hiking

Hiking

70 miles of trails

This 70-mile hiking and backpacking trail from Ohiopyle State Park to near Johnstown is the main feature of the park. The trail traverses state parks, state forests, state game lands, other public lands and private lands.

The Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail is open year round and is blazed approximately every 100 feet with two-inch and five-inch yellow blazes. Connector trails lead to and from parking and shelter areas and are marked with blue blazes. Mileage monuments are every mile.

Pets are permitted.

Trailheads

Six trailheads provide parking for 30 cars each as well as trash receptacles.

Voluntary day use registration mailboxes are at each of the trailheads. Day hikers should fill out information cards for vital park attendance data and for use in an emergency.

Trail Running

The Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail is popular with trail runners due to the diverse terrain and unmatched beauty. Visitors run portions of the trail for a workout, or run the whole trail in one day. Some of the most challenging trail runs in the eastern United States are the Laurel Highlands Ultra races, which are held the second Saturday in June.

Hiking Tips and Regulations

Every hiker’s pace varies but a suggested pace of 1.5 miles per hour is average.

  • In general, Laurel Ridge is cooler and receives more precipitation than the surrounding valleys. Dress appropriately.
  • Know the climate and weather conditions on the trail.
  • Dress appropriately and layer clothing. Bring extra clothing, rain gear, water, insect repellent, sunglasses, sunscreen, and poison ivy block.
  • Supervise children in your care. This is particularly important when hiking.
  • Leave a copy of your plans with friends or relatives. Include contact phone numbers and other important information. Day hikers are encouraged to register at the trailhead kiosks for safety reasons.
  • Wear fluorescent orange during hunting seasons when hiking in hunting areas.
  • Familiarize yourself with the natural hazards of the trail.
  • Bring emergency equipment like a first aid kit, whistle, compass, matches, and a blanket. Please be aware that you may be hours away from medical attention.
  • Don’t forget the camera.
  • Water -- Non-potable is available at most trailheads and shelter areas. Be prepared to treat or filter water.
  • Please stay on the trail for your safety and to protect the resource.
  • Horses, bicycles, and motorized vehicles are prohibited on the hiking trail and in the shelter area.
  • Alcoholic beverages are prohibited.
  • All garbage must be placed in provided refuse containers. Refuse containers shall not be removed from designated “pick-up” stations. Burying garbage is prohibited.
  • Please no frivolous 911 calls. Responding emergency personnel and equipment may be at your expense.